Fire on the mountain: habitat flammability changes over decades

“Close to, the fire on the mountain was very much more alarming than it had seemed from a distance. They could smell it now, and hear it; smell the smoke more bitter than a farm bonfire; hear the soft, dreadful sound of flames consuming the bracken, like paper crumpled in…

A Fan Tale

(Photo of fantail by Jon Sullivan, CC-BY_NC, www.flickr.com/photos/mollivan_jon/26851270492/) Jerusha Brown is in her final year of a Bachelor of Science majoring in Conservation and Ecology at Lincoln University. She spent the summer doing a research scholarship and tells us about one of her results. Fantails are one of the most common,…

Nematode outlines and wormy crop problems: the fifth EcoLincNZ podcast

Adrian talks to Dr Manjula Kularathna who has just stared at a lecturer at Lincoln University. Manjula is passionate about nematodes and cricket. Manjula is particularly interested in nematodes that affect crops and has worked extensively on nematodes in soy and maize crops. New Zealand has been lacking any researcher in…

Field work in the Southern Alps: undergraduate research on introduced pests

Veronica Price-Jones was an international exchange student that came to Lincoln University in 2017. She did the ECOL 393 Field Ecology Research course and recounts her experiences here. Admittedly, my ECOL393 experience did not get off to the most auspicious start. Thanks to a combination of cancelled, delayed and missed…

Don’t wait for gaint eagles: Tolkien’s solution when all seems lost

Tolkien was a literature scholar and had some interesting ideas about stories and the world. One of these ideas was that of the ‘eucatastrophe’. A criticism of Tolkien’s work is that sudden unlooked for events provide happy outcomes when all seems lost. Giant eagles rescue the heroes from likely death and…

Weta motels, beetle show and tells and biodiversity positive cows: the fourth EcoLincNZ podcast

Mike Bowie has been passionate about preserving and restoring biodiversity for his whole career. He has worked with a number of community groups to achieve this goal. He is also very active in outreach and can often be found with school groups introducing the next generations to the diversity of…

Darwin and the Sandwalk: summer break!

It’s hard to visualise Darwin in swimming trunks. In fact we are so used to seeing a very old Darwin looking all stately that it’s hard to image him doing anything normal. Darwin was a real family man and spent a lot of time with his children. I imagine that…

Ski field beetles, insect museums and naming species: the third EcoLincNZ podcast

In this podcast Adrian interviews John Marris, curator of the Lincoln University Entomology Research Museum. He tells us how he got into the insect world, a brief history of the insect collection, how it weathered the Canterbury earthquakes, the strengths of the collection, how it compares to other notable New…

Weedy pests, wild kiwifruit, myrtle death rust and watching nature: the second EcoLincNZ podcast

Dr Jon Sullivan has been interested in interactions all of his life. Increasingly he has become more passionate about monitoring and surveillance of biodiversity of both introduced and native varieties. Adrian talks with him about how he got into ecology, discovering insect species in Costa Rica, wild kiwifruit, understanding weedy…

Moonshots, PredatorfreeNZ, camera traps and pest shyness: the very first Ecolincnz podcast!

Welcome to the very first Ecolincnz podcast. In this series I (Adrian Paterson) talk with New Zealand ecologists about issues of the day and the research that they are doing. Today we start with Dr James Ross who works in managing the mammalian pests running rampant in New Zealand. We…