About The Seal’s Latest Meals

Soon after their arrival, human settlers started to hunt the New Zealand fur seals (Arctocephalus forsteri) from the islands’ shores and in its sounds. The pinnipeds were harvested for their meat by Maori, as well as by Europeans, who in addition found them quite useful for their fur (hence their…

Unhappy Feet: A Long March for the Adélies

The continent of Antarctica, the largest desert on Earth, is well known as the coldest and windiest place in the world. It is amazing to most that some plants and animals survive and thrive amidst these unforgiving conditions. Among those animals are several species of resilient penguins: the Adélies, Chinstraps,…

Kicking up a stink for the beneficial re-use of biosolids

Just 5.5% of New Zealand soils have enough natural fertility for food production. Yet here in NZ, with our trademark ‘no.8 wire can-do’ attitude, you’ll find we manage to produce a very large amount of food. When you think about it though, that’s a hefty amount of no. 8 wire…

We are all connected: Next generation ecology salvation

We live in an era of changes, where it is easy to get caught up in the rapidly changing environments. Change is a natural process, and from the early stages of our life we encounter it. For example, communication technology, from pigeon post to the use of internet and social…

Ecology by the numbers

It is probably safe to say that the job description of an ecologist in 2016 is quite different from that of an ecologist back in the 1970’s or 1980’s. Our work today involves computer programs and fancy technology, some of which make our work much easier. But some appear to make…

Ecology and the future of universities

Lately I have come across several examples of discussion about the future of universities (or rather the lack of a future for universities). There seems to be a couple of main themes. First, if I can do my degree by distance then wouldn’t I be better to get my degree…

Coffee and ecology: the curious case of science funding

Science is a curious thing. There must be few professions where you train people for at least seven years, bring them to a high level of expertise, but then don’t give them reliable means to do their job or to use their skills. Science funding (finding the resources to actually do…