Of marbled cats and wedding hats

Recently, Julie and I shared our 25th wedding anniversary. It was a startling reminder of the onrushing progress of time. Sure, plenty has happened in those 25 years, children have been born and graduated from university, pets have come and gone, hundreds of students have been taught, research has been…

An ode to Mt Kaputar National Park: A little piece of New Zealand in a wide, brown land

Tim Curran is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Pest-management and Conservation at Lincoln University. Here he shares his passion for a little bit of New Zealand in Australia. Mt Kaputar National Park, in northern New South Wales, is my favourite national park, for several reasons. First, there is…

Cat selfies make the world a better place!

Preparing for a significant birthday recently, I was on the hunt for photos of me as a baby. I realised fairly quickly that I didn’t have very many. Certainly fewer photos that I would now take on a single, normal, weekend day if I was with my family. That’s not…

The iNatural selection? A tool for biodiversity monitoring by community-based groups in NZ

With increasing environmental change, more people are volunteering or becoming members of biodiversity community groups. These people care about the environment, such as biodiversity, pest control, nature observation and especially restoration of areas. In recent decades, many wild areas in New Zealand have benefited from some short or long-term restoration…

A range of different ferns

The fern is emblematic of New Zealand, appearing on most of our national sports teams and as a default for our nonofficial flag. The fern seems like a good choice to represent the people and places on our shaky islands. Ferns are unassuming, green and not flashy, getting their ecosystems…

Weta motels, beetle show and tells and biodiversity positive cows: the fourth EcoLincNZ podcast

Mike Bowie has been passionate about preserving and restoring biodiversity for his whole career. He has worked with a number of community groups to achieve this goal. He is also very active in outreach and can often be found with school groups introducing the next generations to the diversity of…

Weedy pests, wild kiwifruit, myrtle death rust and watching nature: the second EcoLincNZ podcast

Dr Jon Sullivan has been interested in interactions all of his life. Increasingly he has become more passionate about monitoring and surveillance of biodiversity of both introduced and native varieties. Adrian talks with him about how he got into ecology, discovering insect species in Costa Rica, wild kiwifruit, understanding weedy…

Zombies of Zealandia? A Halloween review of the Ghosts of Gondwana

(This review was published in the New Zealand Ecological Society newsletter no. 160, July 2017, pp 22-24)   Earlier this year I was in the Southern Alps with a first year field trip where we look at the geology of the region and what it tells us about the biological…

Romeo and Juliweta: kissing cousins or rival families?

Romeo and Juliet. Star-crossed lovers from two feuding families. What makes this story so epic, and such a tragedy, is that the Capulet and Montague families are such bitter enemies. The star-crossed lovers have it all in front of them if they want love to triumph. They might ask themselves…

When history is evolution: the seals of Banks Peninsula

Recently, I caught up with an old school friend. It seems a long time since we played aspects of the same character in the musical “I was a teenage Jekyll and Hyde” at South Otago High School. Brent has a successful career as a history teacher, publishing text books and generally…