Turning industrial agriculture into eco-agriculture: a plea for more effort

Mara Neef is a postgraduate student who wrote this article as part of her Euroleague for Life Sciences course work at Lincoln University. Biodiversity is declining in countries with industrial agriculture, such as New Zealand and the European Union member states. An increase in food production and the protection of…

Misty Mountains grazed: the reality of Lord-of-the-Rings scenery

Before I came to New Zealand from the US, I had thought that the footage from the Lord of the Rings of rolling green hills and idyllic countryside represented how lush and natural New Zealand was. I discovered when I came here that those rolling green hills are mostly invasive,…

50 glades of grey: Farming the cloud forests

My favourite author is Tanith Lee. Perhaps I should say that she was my favourite as she recently passed away. I came across two slim novellas in a bookshop in Balclutha in early 1984 and devoured Companions on the Road and The Winter Players on the 2nd and 3rd March 1984…

Messages from the burning bush – seeking PhD applicants for research on plant flammability

Fire is one of the most pervasive and significant ecological disturbances worldwide. Wildfires are likely to become more frequent and/or severe in the future in many parts of the world due to climate change. To help understand the effects of fire on ecosystems or human infrastructure it is important to…

A bird at hand is worth… a lot more bush

       Ross Carter-Brown is a postgraduate student in the Department of Ecology at Lincoln University. Here he writes about an ongoing project that started off as a summer scholarship. Restoration projects tend t  o focus on mass plantings to revegetate a site and achieve canopy closure as soon as possible. These plantings…

Fly my pretties

This article was prepared by postgraduate student Nick MacDonald as part of the ECOL 608 Research Methods in Ecology course.For those of you who have ever ventured beyond the boundaries of buildings and urban assemblages you would at some stage be greeted by one of Mother Nature’s miracles of aviation….

Newly discovered interaction has farmers buzzing

This article was prepared by postgraduate student Sam Read as part of the ECOL 608 Research Methods in Ecology course.Nature is full of wonderful and surprising phenomena. Organisms can often be linked directly or indirectly in amazing and unpredictable ways. It came as somewhat of a surprise when honeybees were…

Mothbusters! The importance of forest fragments in nature conservation

This article was prepared by postgraduate student Elise Arnst as part of the ECOL 608 Research Methods in Ecology course. New Zealand has vast areas of highly modified and fragmented, disconnected landscapes. It is important for the conservation of biodiversity to understand the ecology in these modified, human-dominated landscapes. Urbanised…

The spirit of wine shall be green

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Juan F. Dueñas Serrano as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). “I know the cost in pain, in sweat,And in burning sunlight on the blazing hillside,Of creating my life, of giving me a soul:I shall not be ungrateful…