Banks Peninsula Biodiversity Workshop: Proceedings

The Biodiversity Workshop that was held at Akaroa in October 2009 is now available as a proceedings. The proceedings compile information from the various presentations given on the day and were put together by Mike Bowie, Rachel Barker and Tina Troup. Over the course of a very successful day, scientists,…

How many? Where-abouts?

In order to estimate the total population of a species you need to know the mean size of local populations and where the populations are. Numbers and amount of sites where species are present are usually linked and this is referred to as the abundance-occupancy relationship. However, there are many…

More ‘What did you do in your summer holidays’

Hamish Patrick, an undergraduate at Lincoln University, was awarded a summer scholarship to survey the Lepidoptera fauna of Otamahua from November 2009 to February 2010 with his supervisor Mike Bowie. Light-trapping on Otamahua involved using a powerful mercury-vapour lamp powered by a portable generator. During his nocturnal forays Hamish collected,…

I spy road-kill

the outcome of stoat versus car Originally uploaded by Mollivan Jon Nature doesn’t operate at the speed of Twitter. Well, maybe it does for microbes. It takes more patience to see changes in populations of big things like birds and trees. It typically requires stitching together lots of observations over…

Weta accommodation popular, long-drops included!

What is the plight of the Banks Peninsula tree weta, Hemideina ricta, the rarest tree weta in New Zealand? The Banks Peninsula Conservation Trust helped Lincoln University contact over 40 enthusiastic landowners keen to know if they had weta on their patch. The resulting Weta Watchers group has helped put…

BioBlitz Lincoln 2009: 1637 species in 24 hours!

On the 3–4 April 2009 hundreds of people gathered at the Liffey Stream in Lincoln to experience the chaos of exploration and discovery that is a BioBlitz. This 24 hour scientific race against time and educational event was held in conjunction with Lincoln Envirotown, Lincoln University and Landcare Research. The…

The thin red line

As far as dangerous beasts go, New Zealand is probably the safest place on earth! While other countries can boast of super venomous snakes, small fish with razor-sharp teeth, or horrible parasites that dig through your skin we can only shuffle uncomfortably and mention our poisonous spider. Which killed at…

Life on a southern beech

sooty black beech forestOriginally uploaded by Mollivan Jon The southern beeches of New Zealand (Nothofagus species) make up a major forest-type which is extensive throughout the North and South Islands. Studies in beech forests usually focus on the roles of the trees as canopy for forest-floor ecosystems. A new study…

The different meanings of ‘Gondwanan’

Tuatara, leiopelmatid frogs, weta (Orthoptera), peripatus (Onychophora), southern beech (Nothofagus) and kauri (Agathis australis) and other New Zealand species are often referred to as Gondwanan taxa. What does this mean? Gondwanaland was a large landmass made up of the southern continents that slowly broke apart through Jurassic and Cretaceous time….