Energy or food, what would you choose?

One of the major global challenges we are currently faced with is providing enough food for our ever-growing global population. As most people are aware now, the global population is going to increase from 7.3 billion to roughly 9.7 billion by 2050. We are already facing issues with food shortages and…

On the value of ecology

I often find that I have to comment on the value of ecology. One gets the sense when talking to some people that they wonder why we need to bother with ecology. Surely there are more pressing issues and more immediate uses of limited funds? This has been particularly true…

Saving the planet, one bottle of wine at a time.

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Michael Fake as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). Michael revisits a Lincoln University research area that looks at increasing pollinators in vineyards published in 2012. We have entered a period of global declines in both managed and wild pollinator…

The rules of attraction

It’s the end of the year and, as such, I get to combine two things that I like and dislike the most. It’s cricket season with representative tournaments all over the place. I am fortunate to have three boys with good cricket ability and I have a real passion for…

Darwin down on the farm

To Darwin, agriculture was a vital source of evidence for evolution and for natural selection. One area where Wallace disagreed with Darwin was in how useful agriculture was in explaining evolution. Wallace thought that the comparison was not very close nor was it very effective whereas Darwin devoted much space…

Fly my pretties

This article was prepared by postgraduate student Nick MacDonald as part of the ECOL 608 Research Methods in Ecology course.For those of you who have ever ventured beyond the boundaries of buildings and urban assemblages you would at some stage be greeted by one of Mother Nature’s miracles of aviation….

Butterflies and wine: friends or foes?

This article was prepared by postgraduate student Hannah Lewis as part of the ECOL 608 Research Methods in Ecology course.Most of us enjoy the sight of a butterfly flitting around our backyard, however many of us will not be aware of the importance of native butterflies in agricultural ecosystems and…

The spirit of wine shall be green

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Juan F. Dueñas Serrano as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). “I know the cost in pain, in sweat,And in burning sunlight on the blazing hillside,Of creating my life, of giving me a soul:I shall not be ungrateful…