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Bartering Biodiversity – Offset or Upset?

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Cathy Mountier as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). Cathy revisits a Lincoln University research area that looks at the value of biodiversity offsets published in 2008. I love a win-win approach to problem solving. Wouldn’t it be…

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Conservation in our time!

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Alex Rowell as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). Alex revisits a Lincoln University research area that looks at the value of biodiversity offsets published in 2009.   Is biodiversity offsetting a viable conservation strategy? Or does it simply distract us…

What they will be doing this summer

Every summer the Department of Ecology offers summer scholarships to undergraduates to get a taste of research (and to be paid for 10 weeks doing it). It’s a great way to figure out if this research lark is for you, to make contacts and to meet staff and postgraduates. This…

Sharing knowledge with the community – the Styx Living Laboratory Trust

This article was prepared by postgraduate student Megan Oliver as part of the ECOL 608 Research Methods in Ecology course. Communities around New Zealand are becoming more aware of the state of natural areas in their community and how they are becoming degraded from pollution. This awareness has resulted in…

Bringing nature (back) into cities…

This article was prepared by postgraduate student Cynthia Resendiz as part of the ECOL 608 Research Methods in Ecology course. “Canterbury plains are one of the worst examples of the loss of native plants in New Zealand…less than 0.5% of native vegetation remains on our plains”, New Zealand’s Spellerberg, a…

Urban Realities: the contribution of residential gardens to the conservation of urban forest remnants

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Elisabeth Christensen as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). Urbanization has destroyed and fragmented natural areas, resulting in decreasing native biodiversity. Fragmented natural areas can only sustain small populations of plants and animals, and these are often vulnerable…

Success for Nina Valley Restoration Group

Hurunui College established the “Nina Valley Restoration Group” at the start of 2009. Nina Valley is located near Lewis Pass and is a region of beech forest. The valley has a good level of accessibility with tracks running from the road to the head. A major goal of the group…

Banks Peninsula Biodiversity Workshop: Proceedings

The Biodiversity Workshop that was held at Akaroa in October 2009 is now available as a proceedings. The proceedings compile information from the various presentations given on the day and were put together by Mike Bowie, Rachel Barker and Tina Troup. Over the course of a very successful day, scientists,…

Town cats visit the wet rats

Cats are common pets all around the world. Nowhere is this so pronounced as in New Zealand where we have the highest rate of cats/households in the world. One of things that we like about cats is their independence but this comes with a downside – what does your cat…

Sheltering the homeless spider

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Karel Lindsay as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). Katipo spiderPhoto by Mollivan Jon In the face of degradation of the environment and loss of species biodiversity, there is a call for innovative bio-indicators. New Zealand native spiders…