Blue hotels: nestsite location in Little Penguins

Little Penguins (or Blue Penguins, Korora, Eudyptula minor or even, in Australia, Fairy Penguins) are the most common penguin to be found in New Zealand. They have numerous colonies ranging from a few nest to several thousands and they are found all around our shorelines.Despite being the most numerous penguin…

The Citizens of Mushroom City

Sky Blue Mushroom (Entoloma hochstetteri) – one of many fungi found within New Zealand This article was prepared by postgraduate student Olga Petko as part of the ECOL 608 Research Methods in Ecology course. When we hear the word “biodiversity” magnificent tigers and cute koalas, beautiful coral fish and bright…

Kokako successfully anchored in ‘safe’ forest

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Anna Reuleaux as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). North Island kokako are an endangered New Zealand forest species known for their beautiful song. In the past conservationists have translocated these birds from mainland areas to managed islands…

Urban Realities: the contribution of residential gardens to the conservation of urban forest remnants

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Elisabeth Christensen as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). Urbanization has destroyed and fragmented natural areas, resulting in decreasing native biodiversity. Fragmented natural areas can only sustain small populations of plants and animals, and these are often vulnerable…

Banks Peninsula Biodiversity Workshop: Proceedings

The Biodiversity Workshop that was held at Akaroa in October 2009 is now available as a proceedings. The proceedings compile information from the various presentations given on the day and were put together by Mike Bowie, Rachel Barker and Tina Troup. Over the course of a very successful day, scientists,…

Measuring the productivity of threatened-species programmes

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Benard Ochieng as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). TuataraOriginally uploaded by beedieu Out of the 7–20 million species believed to be on the planet, a loss ranging between 140,000– 5 million is projected over the next 25…

Will nature sort itself out?

This blog post was written by postgraduate student Phil Cochrane as part of the course, Research Methods in Ecology (Ecol 608). “At worst, the current practice of founding new populations of endangered species with such small numbers of founders may be inducing widespread reproductive failure and hastening their extinction.” Briskie…